facebook pixel

Adapting delivery methods following COVID-19 – what does the future hold?

Hear from Learning Curve Group as they take a look at the impact that COVID-19 has had on education and what this means for the future of the sector.

From the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, every sector has adapted to a new way of functioning, and education has been no different. Classroom teaching ground to a halt, children and adults across the country have been home-schooled, and remote learning has been at the forefront of every school, college and training provider’s approach to delivery. 

As lockdown measures have started to ease; the Prime Minister has announced intentions to “get not just schools, but FE colleges, back … in September, and get our young people back where they need to be in education and prepare for their future”. Even as restrictions ease, there’s no doubting that the ‘new normal’ for the education sector will be somewhat different to what we’ve all been used to. 

Over the last three months, we’ve adopted a completely remote approach. Lessons have taken place over video calls, assessments have been replaced with calculated grades, and learners haven’t seen their peers for months. It has presented many challenges, but it’s also presented many opportunities. The opportunity to learn, and grow, and possibly adopt a more digital-first approach to learning. 

Apprenticeships have seen a national decline in starts but some have managed to buck the trend by enrolling and inducting learners remotely so they can begin their learning journey.

What’s next?

Engaging with learners remotely has allowed teaching and learning to continue and brought education into the realm of the young person; interacting with them in spaces they’re likely much more comfortable in, and that’s a takeaway all providers should value from this period of uncertainty. The need to adapt technology to provide a better learning experience not only gives stronger levels of engagement when classroom delivery is not possible, but also a competitive advantage over other providers.  

Of course, there is no complete replacement for face to face, experiential elements of learning but in the shorter-term, delivery is likely to have to take a more blended approach. Restrictions around social distancing make it extremely difficult to execute classroom delivery to full cohorts, so alternative techniques are something we should seriously consider longer-term, too. We’re also more likely to see a blended approach to work-based learning, with employers restricting access to workplaces as well as the realisation that, often, virtual learning is much more time efficient, too. 

COVID-19 hasn’t just impacted delivery, as the furlough scheme begins to change meaning monetary contributions from employers begin to increase, it’s likely we’ll see a rise in redundancies and unemployment. It’s our job, as learning providers, to support individuals across the country to gain vital skills and position them in the best place possible to secure their next role, taking into consideration all of the learning we’ve done ourselves over the last four months around the most effective way to deliver that training to the people who need it most.

Supporting distance learning and the future of learning

Our partner NCFE has developed high quality qualifications which are suitable for online delivery, which are supported by our delivery-ready resources from Learning Curve Group, to help learners succeed now and in the future.

These qualifications cover a range of disciplines including business, health and employability; areas we know will support the needs of the future workforce.

For further information on these qualifications visit our distance learning webpage.

Lauren Watson
Lauren Watson
A traineeship’s power is its simple, sharp focus on employability and employment. Where other education and training programmes might build the technical skills, knowledge and behaviours a learner needs for a sustained career in a given sector, traineeships help young people smash through the more immediate barrier of finding, getting and keeping a job. Take a look at our five top tips for traineeship triumphs!
Janine Oliver
Janine Oliver
NCFE is an educational charity with the core purpose to ‘promote and advance learning, helping to create a fairer, more inclusive society’. Our primary concern is the opportunities and outcomes that learners achieve in their learning, career and in life.
News Article
News Article
In a time when the attainment gap is widening, exacerbated by the disruption to education during the pandemic, it’s particularly important to focus on the actions we can all take to make education inclusive for those from all backgrounds, situations, and underrepresented groups.
Daniel Howard
Daniel Howard
In June each year, LGBTQ+ communities come together worldwide to honour the Stonewall uprising in 1969, and to promote equal justice and equal opportunity. Of course, simply changing a logo will not result in real change. Our commitment to diversity and inclusion – and driving access to and equality of education for all – goes far beyond this.
Case Study
Case Study
Samantha Dowling, Head of Life Skills at Y Pant Comprehensive School, shares insight into how NCFE’s Level 2 Certificate in Equality and Diversity is helping pupils to challenge stereotypes.